Benefits of Closing an Open or Expired Building Permit

 

Attending an open house in one of the popular places in U.S. is an exciting experience. Why wouldn’t it be? After all, you might finally find a house where you can start your own family and spend the rest of your life. Imagine having your own dream house. Then, suddenly, that dream house turns into a gateway to hell because you discovered it has an open or expired building permit.

You don’t want the same thing to happen to your clients. So, it’s important that you familiarize them with the benefits of closing a home’s building permit, by getting an Engineering Affidavit:

1. It’s a Protection Against Fraud

A permit closure letter aka Engineering Affidavit is proof that a house passed the building code standards. It’s true that most houses have building permits but it doesn’t necessarily mean they’re legally acceptable. In fact, some houses are built without following the correct building code. According to the Hillsborough County Government of Florida, construction should be done in compliance with existing building codes, land development codes and other regulations.

2. It Allows the Owner to do Future Work

If the City or County pulls up an open or expired permit when you file for a new permit, they won’t let you proceed with the new work. That means if your Roof is leaking or your AC has to be replaced, you won’t be able to pull a permit to perform this work until the old permit is taken care of.

3. It Supports a Hazard Report

A closure letter validates a detailed hazard report. Based on the Residential Permit Application Requirements of Lee County Southwest Florida, if the property is located on a barrier island, i.e. Captiva, Upper Captiva, etc., the construction drawings must be sealed by a registered Florida architect or engineer, and must address the Coastal Construction Zone, in addition to flood zone. In other words, it gives buyers an unbiased view about the possible dangers of the house’s location.

4. It Qualifies a Home for An Insurance Policy

A closure letter tells whether a home gets an insurance policy or not. After being hit by many devastating hurricanes, insurance companies in Florida has learned a valuable lesson—pickiness in giving an insurance policy. Basically, older homes (built in the 90s) are more prone to hurricanes than those which are new. Therefore, older homes with open or expired permits, that don’t pass wind mitigation standards, are not insured.

Finishing What Has Been Started

Closing an open or expired building permit is not a long process and can be done in under a week. Yet, it effectively spares buyers from physical and financial burdens.

Article written by Leo Cannyn. Cannyn is Beryl Project Engineering’s Principal Project Manager who holds a State of Florida license in Professional Engineering, Home Inspection, Liquor Distribution, a Project Management Institute certification as a Project Management Professional, a Envision Sustainability Professional Certification from the Institute for Sustainable Infrastructure, an Infrared Certified Professional Designation from the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors, is on the HUD FHA and 203k consultant rosters, and is a Certified Master Inspector through the Master Inspector Certification Board. Find out more information about Beryl here: http://www.berylprojectengineering.com

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